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Where and why the prevailing theory of biology has gone wrong might hold the very key we need in order to understand our failure to treat cancer—especially metastatic cancer.

Press play to discover:

  • Why doctors should regard cancer as its own organism with its own homeostatic drive and cellular intelligence, and how this understanding can shed light on the failure to treat late-stage cancers
  • How radiation therapy and chemotherapy provoke mutations in tissues, and how this also explains why these therapies can work initially, but the cancer resurfaces years later
  • How extracellular vesicles, viruses, and sperm cells are similar, and how this is related to the primary drive of speciation
  • How lung cancer can be detected in people who have absolutely no symptoms

Professor Denis Noble of the Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics at the University of Oxford has been studying physiology and evolutionary biology for decades, and has made many discoveries and published countless papers along the way. Despite this, it wasn’t more than a year ago that he would have said, “I don’t know anything about cancer.” To his surprise, a mounting body of research and evidence is showing that he might know a whole lot more about cancer than he thinks.

And why is that? Because of the relationship between the evolution of species and cancer itself.

Noble dives into the details of this relationship, and so much more, including early detection methods for lung and other types of cancer, the role of the immune system in picking up cancer cells that are in our body at any point in time (but never develop into cancer as we know it), decentralized cellular control in the body, what can be learned by the exosomes put out by cancer cells, the failure of the standard of care prescribed for metastatic cancers, the importance of keeping our immune systems healthy, and the microenvironment of a primary tumor vs. metastasis.

Tune in for all the details.

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